Check out this pre show warm up in Akron, 2007


A short video of the Akron show...
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All of the works in these CBP series are acrylic multi-media on backed MDF panels (2006-2007)


The Following paintings are from the CBP 10th anniversary show in Akron, Ohio at the MillWorks Gallery. 
This snapshot shows how works looked like at the time of the opening, as several of the pieces have changed and are now featured at:  www.craig-alan-anderson.com
 

These six works below measure 16.5"wx12"h.



The five works in the series below measure 16.5w"x16.5h"
 



The three works below measure 18"x24". 



The seven works below measure 24"x24". 



The three works below measure 24"x30".



The four works below measure 32"x32".





Artist Statement
Craig Alan Anderson on:
Custom Brand Painting, an introduction…

    My journey with paint began in 1994 at the Columbus College of Art and Design.  I was able to find great intrigue in the challenge that the dynamics of painting had to offer and had been inspired by the likes of Diebenkorn, Twombly, Toulouse-Lautrec, Warhol, Beuys, Guston, and Basquiat.
    There are some common themes that appear in this body of work that have been in development for several years.  These might include the helmet (football/ arcaic warriors), the tread (tank/ snowcat), mountain scapes and fairly simple lanscape dynamics, references to NORAD and several personal brands such as: Custom Brand Painting, Fresh Paint Job, and Paint Flow.  (Please look for other themes/ iconography not mentioned…)
    The Helmet and “athletic” themeology were introduced in 1996 during a collaborative lithographic project with Jeremiah Ketner (Ill.).  The helmet was originally meant to be an absurd contrast to the quality drafted horse with which Jeremiah started the stone.  I used a photo-copy transfer to impose a helmet on the horse's head and then drew some “ cleats” on its feet.  As time went on my fascination with the helmet shape and structure continued.  It means more to me now than just hijynx.  A helmet can represent a structure like a home, a safe place which offers protection (for the head/brain), but it can also become a vessel: like the ones used by military survialists who collected dew in their partially buried helmets in efforts to stay alive.  At bare minumum the helmet also represents my “team CBP” or the Custom Brand Players, as well as the archaic warrior and those who fight for their beliefs. The dynamic of the artist athelete has always captivated me.  Much like in sports, the art world is very competative but usually the dynamic of a "team" is reversed. 
    The Tread is indicative of a tank, snowcat, or any heavy machinery.  This image was burned into my mind while snowboarding as a youth.  The snowcat is a powerful mode of transportation in unfavorable conditions.  The Tread speaks of perserverence, at times arriving heavily handed at it’s destination.
    The Norad or “N” image represents intrigue and the desire for understanding and true knowledge.  I have spent time during summers of the past in an art program located in Colorado Springs, CO.  The room I stayed in had a window that faced Cheyenne Mountain, the home of NORAD.  I wondered what was going on in there and how much power might actually be harnessed in that mountain.  It is a world within a world, much like our minds. 
    The idea of personal branding is a reaction to the modern brand based global economy.  In order to tap into the art mainstream, an artist needs some type of quality aesthetical “product”.  Still in the early stages, one can already collect or purchase quality items from the following Anderson Brands: Custom Brand Painting, Fresh Paint Job, and Paint Flow.  
    Word play is also apparent in these works, which is meant to provide a subordinate possibility of open interpretation for a viewer.  I have been influenced by games such as Scrabble, Boggle, and Crosswords.  Language in general fascinates me, especially modern slang and its relation to pop culture. 

-Craig Alan Anderson  Feb. 2007